Worls Masters Rowing Chapionships - Helen strikes Gold in Italy! And Masters men win in Manchester!

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Saturday, 28 September 2013 15:07 Written by Administrator

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This year the World Masters Rowing Championships took place in Varese in Northern Italy. The annual event began in Vienna in 1973 with 700 boats from 10 countries. By 2008 there were 1500 crews from 36 countries. The venue changes each year and has been held in cities as far apart as Prague, Amsterdam, Adelaide, Montreal and Seville. This year a record entry of 3,355 rowers from 70 countries and 633 clubs raced over 1,000m every 3 minutes for four days. Races are held in all classes of racing boats from single sculls to eights in age categories that range from A (27 year olds) to K (85 year olds). The Italians had the largest team, the Germans were next and the British third most numerous. The oldest man was 94 from Switzerland and the oldest woman was 82 from Spain. Most competitors race in more than one event.

Nottingham Rowing Club men and women were there in force having towed a trailer full of boats 1,000 miles through the Alps to Italy.

Women's Coach Helen Bloor showed that she had lost none of her competitive edge by winning D coxless pairs with her Tideway Scullers partner. Giving her great support was Bill Payne who not only won I Double sculls but was given a medal for J Sculls in strange circumstances when he appeared to take a detour as his race finished and he ended up on the presentation stage. Bill has an unpresedented collection of medals from world championships and is the club's most prolific winner.

Whilst one Masters group took on the world in Italy another went 70 miles to Hollingworth Lake near Manchester and returned with two trophies.

Andy Brown, Shane MacSweeney, Mike Walker and Andy Townsend coxed by Clare Angus beat Warrington RC in the final of Masters D fours. They were then joined by Steve Cuthbert, Tony Lorrimer, Derek Crowley and Iain Hill to defeat Liverpool Victoria Rowing Club in the final of D eights.